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ADDRESS
324 Main St S
Sauk Centre
MN 56378

 

HOURS
Monday 8:30 - 8pm
Tuesday 8:30 - 5 pm
Wednesday 9 - 5 pm
Thursday & Friday 8:30 - 5pm

 

 

Our eye clinic and optical is conveniently located in Central Minnesota by Alexandria Lakes Area, Melrose, Freeport, Albany, Avon, Belgrade, Brooten, Elrosa, Long Prairie, Glenwood, Forada, Villard, Osakis, and West Union.

 

 

testimonials

 

 

Testimonial 9/24/13:
I wanted to let Dr. Freese and Marcy know I am pretty pleased with initial results wearing the rigid lenses. I wore them last evening for about 3 1/2 hours and today going on 6. They definitely are not as comfortable as the soft but I can see much better far and close so less overall irritability which is a very good thing :) Thank you, JN



Diseases of the Eye

Any Changes in the Appearance of Your Eyes or Vision Should be Looked Into

    • Difficulty focusing
    • Light sensitivity
    • Change in color of your iris
    • Red or irritated lids
    • Recurrent pain in or around eyes
    • Double vision
    • Spots, lines, edges appear distorted
    • Excess watery eyes
    • Dry, itching, or burning eyes
    • Sudden vision loss
    • Hazy or blurred vision
    • Flashes or black spots
    • Halos or rainbows around light
    • Curtain-like blotting out vision
    • Loss of peripheral (side) vision
    Regular eye examinations are the best way to detect and correct small problems before they become big ones.
    Make an appointment today to ensure a healthy tomorrow!

Refractive Errors

Hyperopia

Farsightedness, or hyperopia, as it is medically termed, is a vision condition in which distant objects are usually seen clearly, but close ones do not come into proper focus. Farsightedness occurs if your eyeball is too short or the cornea has too little curvature, so light entering your eye is not focused correctly. Common signs of farsightedness include difficulty in concentrating and maintaining a clear focus on near objects, eye strain, fatigue and/or headaches after close work, aching or burning eyes, irritability or nervousness after sustained concentration.

Myopia

Nearsightedness, or myopia, as it is medically termed, is a vision condition in which near objects are seen clearly, but distant objects do not come into proper focus. Nearsightedness occurs if your eyeball is too long or the cornea has too much curvature, so the light entering your eye is not focused correctly. A sign of nearsightedness is difficulty seeing distant objects like a movie or TV screen or chalkboard.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a vision condition that occurs when the front surface of your eye, the cornea, is slightly irregular in shape. This irregular shape prevents light from focusing properly on the back of your eye, the retina. As a result, your vision may be blurred at all distances. People with severe astigmatism will usually have blurred or distorted vision, while those with mild astigmatism may experience headaches, eye strain, fatigue or blurred vision at certain distances. Most people have some degree of astigmatism.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia is a vision condition in which the crystalline lens of your eye loses its flexibility, which makes it difficult for you to focus on close objects. Presbyopia may seem to occur suddenly, but the actual loss of flexibility takes place over a number of years. Presbyopia usually becomes noticeable in the early to mid-40s. Presbyopia is a natural part of the aging process of the eye. It is not a disease, and it cannot be prevented. Some signs of presbyopia include the tendency to hold reading materials at arm's length, blurred vision at normal reading distance and eye fatigue along with headaches when doing close work.

 

Ocular Conditions

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye disorders leading to progressive damage to the optic nerve, and is characterized by loss of nerve tissue resulting in loss of vision. The optic nerve is a bundle of about one million individual nerve fibers and transmits the visual signals from the eye to the brain. The most common form of glaucoma, primary open-angle glaucoma, is often associated with an increase in the fluid pressure inside the eye. This increase in pressure may cause progressive damage to the optic nerve and loss of nerve fibers. Vision loss may result. Advanced glaucoma may even cause blindness. Not everyone with high eye pressure will develop glaucoma, and many people with normal eye pressure will develop glaucoma. When the pressure inside an eye is too high for that particular optic nerve, whatever that pressure measurement may be, glaucoma will develop. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the U.S.

The most common form of glaucoma, primary open-angle glaucoma, develops slowly and usually without any symptoms. Many people do not become aware they have the condition until significant vision loss has occurred. It initially affects peripheral or side vision, but can advance to central vision loss. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to significant loss of vision in both eyes, and may even lead to blindness.

Age Related Macular Degeneration

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in adults over age 50. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 1.8 million people have AMD and another 7.3 million are at substantial risk for vision loss from AMD. Caucasians are at higher risk for developing AMD than other races. Women also develop AMD at an earlier age than men. This eye disease occurs when there are changes to the macula, a small portion of the retina that is located on the inside back layer of the eye. AMD is a loss of central vision that can occur in two forms: “dry” or atrophic and “wet” or exudative. Most people with macular degeneration have the dry form, for which there is no known treatment. The less common wet form may respond to laser or drug treatment procedures, if diagnosed and treated early.

Researchers have linked eye-friendly nutrients such as lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc to reducing the risk of certain eye diseases, including cataracts. For more information on the importance of good nutrition and eye health, please see the diet and nutrition section.

Symptoms include:

  • Gradual loss of ability to see objects clearly
  • Distorted vision
  • Gradual loss of color vision
  • Dark or empty area appearing in the center of vision

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition occurring in persons with diabetes, which causes progressive damage to the retina, the light sensitive lining at the back of the eye. It is a serious sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that interferes with the body's ability to use and store sugar, which can cause many health problems. Too much sugar in the blood can cause damage throughout the body, including the eyes. Over time, diabetes affects the circulatory system of the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is the result of damage to the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina. They leak blood and other fluids that cause swelling of retinal tissue and clouding of vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely they will develop diabetic retinopathy. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness.

Symptoms include:

  • Seeing spots or floaters in your field of vision, which look like small particles or fine threads
  • Blurred vision
  • Having a dark or empty spot in the center of your vision
  • Difficulty seeing well at night

Cataract

A cataract is a cloudy or opaque area in the normally clear lens of the eye. Depending upon its size and location, it can interfere with normal vision. Most cataracts develop in people over age 55, but they occasionally occur in infants and young children. Usually cataracts develop in both eyes, but one may be worse than the other. Researchers have linked eye-friendly nutrients such as lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc to reducing the risk of certain eye diseases, including cataracts. For more information on the importance of good nutrition and eye health, please see the diet and nutrition section.

Symptoms include:

  • Blurred or hazy vision
  • Reduced intensity of colors
  • Increased sensitivity to glare from lights, particularly when driving at night
  • Increased difficulty seeing at night
  • Change in the eye's refractive error

Retinal Detachment

The part of the eye which collects light and transmits the light messages to the optic nerve and brain is the retina. It lines the inner back wall of the eye. When the retina separates from the back wall, it is known as a retinal detachment. It is a serious condition which can cause permanent damage and vision loss if not treated quickly.

Symptoms include:

  • A sudden defect in your vision
  • Blind spots almost too small to notice that may obscure your vision
  • An increase in floaters, which look like small particles or fine threads, may also be noticed
  • Flashes of light

Dry Eye

Dry eye is a condition in which there are insufficient tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. People with dry eyes either do not produce enough tears or have a poor quality of tears. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.

Symptoms include:

  • Irritated, gritty, scratchy, or burning eyes
  • Feeling of something in their eyes
  • Excess watering
  • Blurred vision

Blepharitis

Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids causing red, irritated, itchy eyelids and the formation of dandruff-like scales on eyelashes. It is a common eye disorder caused by either bacteria or a skin condition such as dandruff of the scalp or acne rosacea. It affects people of all ages. Although uncomfortable, blepharitis is not contagious and generally does not cause any permanent damage to eyesight.

Blepharitis is classified into two types:

  1. Anterior blepharitis occurs at the outside front edge of the eyelid where the eyelashes are attached.
  2. Posterior blepharitis affects the inner edge of the eyelid that comes in contact with the eyeball.

Symptoms include:

  • Gritty or burning sensation in their eyes
  • Excessive tearing, itching, red and swollen eyelids
  • Dry eyes
  • Crusting of the eyelids
  • For some people, blepharitis causes only minor irritation and itching. However, it can lead to more severe signs and symptoms such as blurring of vision, missing or misdirected eyelashes, and inflammation of other eye tissue, particularly the cornea.

Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the thin transparent layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eyelid and covers the white part of the eye. Conjunctivitis, often called “pink eye,” is a common eye disease, especially in children. It may affect one or both eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis can be highly contagious and easily spread in schools and at home. While conjunctivitis is usually a minor eye infection, sometimes it can develop into a more serious problem.

Conjunctivitis may be caused by a viral or bacterial infection. It can also occur due to an allergic reaction to irritants in the air like pollen and smoke, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics or other products that come in contact with the eyes. Sexually transmitted diseases like Chlamydia and gonorrhea are less common causes of conjunctivitis.

Symptoms include:

  • A gritty feeling in one or both eyes
  • Itching or burning sensation in one or both eyes
  • Excessive tearing
  • Discharge coming from one or both eyes
  • Swollen eyelids
  • Pink discoloration to the whites of one or both eyes
  • Increased sensitivity to light

Definitions from American Optometric Association website